Monday, July 21, 2014
walk with my family

walk with my family

Sunday, July 20, 2014

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

Saturday, July 19, 2014
Never try to win an argument. Because whoever wins really loses. man in our store whose been married 69 years
Thursday, July 17, 2014

redbloodedamerica:

Remember this all you easily fooled young women out there.  No one in the Republican Party, or any other party to my knowledge, is trying to restrict access to birth control.  It simply is not true.  However this doesn’t matter for complete liars, like Elizabeth Warren, who make absurd claims that Republicans (the women included mind you) are trying to do so.

There is no Republican “war on women.”  It is a completely bogus political catchphrase to coax women to vote Democrat.

Here’s the rest of Ted Cruz’s amazing speech about the Democrats assault on free speech:

youreabitweird:

kv96ic28:

Yes.  That is very true.  Perhaps one of my best posts this…


reblogging again because yessay no to hillary clinton

youreabitweird:

kv96ic28:

Yes.  That is very true.  Perhaps one of my best posts this…

reblogging again because yes
say no to hillary clinton

Wednesday, July 16, 2014
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Anonymous said: "It's a metaphor" I have no doubt that you completely understand and stand by this statement that the act of putting an unlit cigarette in Augustus Waters' mouth is in fact a metaphor. But for some folks, we don't see it asa metaphor, we see it as situational irony, or a simple statement. Please explain how it is a metaphor.

fishingboatproceeds:

Well, a character in a novel saying that something is a metaphor is not the same thing as the author of the novel saying that it’s a metaphor. Gus’s intellectual grasp often exceeds his reach (he calls a monologue a soliloquy, and misuses quite a few of the bigger words in his vocabulary). But I do think the cigarette is a metaphor, albeit a different one for us than it is for him.

Gus’s idea is that the cigarette is a metaphor for illness, and he keeps it unlit and in his mouth as an expression of his power over illness. “You put the killing thing between your teeth but you don’t give it the power to do its killing.” Gus’s thinking here is that HE has the power. This is why he tends to use the cigarette when he’s feeling nervous or powerless. (He’s also using the most famous commercially available carcinogen to make this statement, so obviously there’s a connection there in his mind: Humans can prevent cancer by not smoking; cancer is something we can have power over; your job is not to give cancer the power to kill you; etc.) 

But of course Gus is wrong about all of this, or at least almost all of it. You may have SOME control over whether you die of cancer (you can choose not to smoke), but in most cases humans don’t have control over illness. “You don’t give it the power to do its killing” imagines more agency over illness than we actually have, because in the end much of the fault is in the stars, not in ourselves. So to us, the unlit cigarette is a metaphor for our false perception of control, and our urgent need to feel in control. It’s no coincidence, then, that when Gus’s life is spiraling out of control and he finds himself powerless before fate, he tries (and fails) to buy cigarettes.

Thursday, July 10, 2014